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Essex biker killed in motorcycle crash in Spain named

This Is Total Essex - Wed, 12/08/2020 - 07:32
Patrick was an experienced biker but at the time of the crash was riding a new bike
Categories: Local News

This is node joke. Tor battles to fend off swarm of Bitcoin-stealing evil exit relays making up about 25% of outgoing capacity at its height

The Register - Wed, 12/08/2020 - 07:14
Cash-strapped privacy devs face determined miscreants who keep coming back for more

The Tor Project has confirmed someone, or some group, is in control of a large number of Bitcoin-snaffling exit nodes in its anonymizing network, and it's battling to boot them off.…

Categories: Technology

Update on condition of people fighting for lives after crash

This Is Total Essex - Wed, 12/08/2020 - 06:46
The crash shut a busy bridge for much of Friday (August 7)
Categories: Local News

Earls Colne crash: Inquest into Erikas Eicas's death opens

Braintree and Witham Times - Wed, 12/08/2020 - 06:00
An inquest into the death of a teenager killed in a crash has been opened.
Categories: Local News

Unite warns of more job losses at Stansted Airport

Braintree and Witham Times - Wed, 12/08/2020 - 06:00
EASYJET has been criticised for pulling out of Stansted as the airport continues to see massive drops in passengers.
Categories: Local News

Polly Darby visits new retirement village in Bocking

Braintree and Witham Times - Wed, 12/08/2020 - 06:00
AN 8-year-old was invited down to a building site after finding out she shared a name with a new development.
Categories: Local News

Baby is delivered in back of car in layby near Harwich

Braintree and Witham Times - Wed, 12/08/2020 - 06:00
GIVING birth is a moment in a women’s life which is unforgettable... especially when your dad and sister deliver your baby in the back of your car in a layby.
Categories: Local News

Softbank confirms talks to offload Arm as it posts rebound profit

The Register - Wed, 12/08/2020 - 05:58
Might float chip-designer, sell it all or sell chunks. Whatever happens, server CPU sales are the upside

SoftBank has bounced back from a historic loss to post profits of $12bn as the company confirms that it is in negotiations to sell British chip designer Arm.…

Categories: Technology

India explores blockchain-powered voting but not to enable online elections

The Register - Wed, 12/08/2020 - 05:02
Verifying wandering voters in the world’s largest and most complex elections is the aim

India has pondered how blockchain might enhance its elections with a high-level online gabfest concluding that the technology might have a role in making it possible for more voters to cast their ballot in more places around the nation.…

Categories: Technology

'Stalkerware' Phone Spying Apps Have Escaped Google's Ad Ban

Slashdot - Wed, 12/08/2020 - 04:30
An anonymous reader quotes a report from TechCrunch: Several companies offering phone-spying apps -- known as "stalkerware" -- are still advertising in Google search results, despite the search giant's ban that took effect today, TechCrunch has found. These controversial apps are often pitched to help parents snoop on their child's calls, messages, apps and other private data under the guise of helping to protect against online predators. But some repurpose these apps to spy on their spouses -- often without their permission. It's a problem that the wider tech industry has worked to tackle. Security firms and antivirus makers are working to combat the rise of stalkerware, and federal authorities have taken action when app makers have violated the law. One of the biggest actions to date came last month when Google announced an updated ads policy, effectively banning companies from advertising phone-snooping apps "with the express purpose of tracking or monitoring another person or their activities without their authorization." Google gave these companies until August 11 to remove these ads. But TechCrunch found seven companies known to provide stalkerware -- including FlexiSpy, mSpy, WebWatcher and KidsGuard -- were still advertising in Google search results after the ban took effect. Google did not say explicitly say if the stalkerware apps violated its policy, but told TechCrunch that it removed ads for WebWatcher. Despite the deadline, Google said that enforcement is not always immediate. "We recently updated our policies to prohibit ads promoting spyware for partner surveillance while still allowing ads for technology that helps parents monitor their underage children," said a Google spokesperson. "To prevent deceitful actors who try to disguise the product's intent and evade our enforcement, we look at several signals like the ad text, creative and landing page, among others, for policy compliance. When we find that an ad or advertiser is violating our policies, we take immediate action."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Technology

Where each area of Essex would be on a Monopoly board

This Is Total Essex - Wed, 12/08/2020 - 04:00
Each area has been compared to an London district on the traditional board
Categories: Local News

Pakistan aims to quadruple IT exports to $5bn, with freelancing youth to the fore

The Register - Wed, 12/08/2020 - 03:27
Which would leave it about four percent of neighboring India’s exports

Pakistan has given itself a new target for IT services exports, hoping that within three years it can win $5bn of revenue.…

Categories: Technology

Police Use of Facial Recognition Violates Human Rights, UK Court Rules

Slashdot - Wed, 12/08/2020 - 03:02
An appeals court ruled today that police use of facial recognition technology in the UK has "fundamental deficiencies" and violates several laws. Ars Technica reports: South Wales Police began using automated facial recognition technology on a trial basis in 2017, deploying a system called AFR Locate overtly at several dozen major events such as soccer matches. Police matched the scans against watchlists of known individuals to identify persons who were wanted by the police, had open warrants against them, or were in some other way persons of interest. In 2019, Cardiff resident Ed Bridges filed suit against the police, alleging that having his face scanned in 2017 and 2018 was a violation of his legal rights. Although he was backed by UK civil rights organization Liberty, Bridges lost his suit in 2019, but the Court of Appeal today overturned that ruling, finding that the South Wales Police facial recognition program was unlawful. "Too much discretion is currently left to individual police officers," the court ruled. "It is not clear who can be placed on the watchlist, nor is it clear that there are any criteria for determining where AFR can be deployed." The police did not sufficiently investigate if the software in use exhibited race or gender bias, the court added. The South Wales Police in 2018 released data admitting that about 2,300 of nearly 2,500 matches -- roughly 92 percent -- the software made at an event in 2017 were false positives. The ruling did not completely ban the use of facial recognition tech inside the UK, but does narrow the scope of what is permissible and what law enforcement agencies have to do to be in compliance with human rights law. Other police inside the UK who deploy facial recognition technology will have to meet the standard set by today's ruling. That includes the Metropolitan Police in London, who deployed a similar type of system earlier this year.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Technology

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