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Spam is Chipotle's secret ingredient: Marketing email hijacked to dish up malware

The Register - Thu, 29/07/2021 - 17:00
More than 120 messages caught trying to filch credentials from customers of USAA Bank, Microsoft

Between July 13 and July 16, someone took over the Mailgun account owned by restaurant chain Chipotle Mexican Grill and placed an order for login credentials using misappropriated marketing messages.…

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New Android Malware Records Smartphones via VNC To Steal Passwords

Slashdot - Thu, 29/07/2021 - 16:49
Security researchers have discovered a novel piece of Android malware that uses the VNC technology to record and broadcast a victim's smartphone activity, allowing threat actors to collect keyboard presses and app passwords. From a report: First spotted in March 2021 by Dutch security firm ThreatFabric, this new piece of malware, named Vultur, is a departure from other Android malware strains that usually rely on fake login screens floating on top of legitimate apps to collect a victim's credentials. Instead, Vultur opens a VNC server on the infected phone, and broadcasts screen captures to an attacker command and control server, where the Vultur operator extracts passwords for desired apps.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Upcoming Android privacy changes include ability to blank advertising ID, and 'safety section' in Play store

The Register - Thu, 29/07/2021 - 16:30
New policies give users more control, but ad tracking still on by default

Google has shared details of upcoming changes to Android including the ability to blank a device's advertising ID, and a new safety section for apps in the Play store.…

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NoSQL Couchbase launches schema-like features to take on the transactional databases of the relational world

The Register - Thu, 29/07/2021 - 15:45
Doing both in one system might be 'somewhat elegant' but user experience remains to be seen, analyst says

Couchbase, the NoSQL database beloved of modern applications developers, is trying to build a bridge to the old world with its 7.0 release.…

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LinkedIn To Allow Most Employees To Work Remotely, Reversing Course

Slashdot - Thu, 29/07/2021 - 15:40
LinkedIn will allow most employees to opt for full-time remote work as offices gradually reopen, Chief People Officer Teuila Hanson told Reuters. From the report: This new policy from Microsoft's professional social networking site is a reversal of the company's initial indication last October that employees would be expected to work from an office 50% of the time, when COVID-19 pandemic restrictions lift. The updated policy, offering employees the flexibility to work remotely full-time or work at an office part-time, will apply to LinkedIn's global workforce of more than 16,000 employees. "We anticipate that we'll definitely see more remote employees than what we saw prior to the pandemic," Hanson said in a Wednesday interview ahead of the announcement, adding that some jobs would require in-office work.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Cook, Pichai Join CEOs Urging Congress Pass Path to Citizenship

Slashdot - Thu, 29/07/2021 - 15:05
More than 90 chief executive officers, including those at Apple, Amazon and Facebook on Thursday urged Congress to pass a law offering a citizenship path to young immigrants brought illegally to the U.S. as children. From a report: In a letter to President Joe Biden and congressional leaders, the executives said thousands of the immigrants -- known as Dreamers -- are "valued employees at our companies," but a federal judge's recent ruling against a program protecting them "throws into chaos" their ability to live and work legally in the U.S. "Securing a pathway to citizenship for Dreamers not only is the right thing to do, but is a huge economic benefit to the United States," the CEOs wrote in the letter. "The latest court ruling makes it all the more urgent that Congress take up and pass a legislative solution right away." The letter seeks to increase pressure on Republicans in Congress who are likely to oppose Democrats' efforts to pass the measure allowing for legal status for as many as 8 million undocumented immigrants.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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BT says it's trading in line with expectations as revenue slides and pre-tax profit shrinks

The Register - Thu, 29/07/2021 - 15:03
Former state monopoly talks up FTTP build out, as does Virgin Media

BT's revenues slipped during the three months to the end of June – when French-owned Altice took a 12.1 per cent stake in the business and the telco went some way to resolving an industrial dispute.…

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Red Hat buddies up with Nutanix to provide an escape route from VMware

The Register - Thu, 29/07/2021 - 14:31
'We have customers saying, help us out of this pickle here, can you possibly just support RHEL running on top of AHV?'

Red Hat is collaborating with Nutanix to make OpenShift and Red Hat Enterprise Linux a fully supported solution on the Nutanix native virtualization platform, AHV.…

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NFT or not to NFT: Steve Jobs' first job application auction shows physically unique beats cryptographically unique

The Register - Thu, 29/07/2021 - 14:01
Great, maybe the trend can FOAD now

A dual-format auction of a physical and digital non-fungible token (NFT) version of a job application penned by Apple co-founder Steve Jobs has come to a close – and the physical side has emerged victorious, by an order of magnitude.…

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Pfizer Vaccine Effectiveness Drops To 84 Percent After Six Months, Study Finds

Slashdot - Thu, 29/07/2021 - 14:00
An anonymous reader quotes a report from The Hill: The effectiveness of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine fell from 96 percent to 84 percent over six months, according to data released on Wednesday. The preprint study funded by the companies determined that the vaccine's effectiveness reached a high point of 96.2 percent within two months after the second dose. But the efficacy "declined gradually" to 83.7 percent within six months, with an average decrease of about 6 percent every two months. But even with the slip in efficacy, the data indicates the vaccine offers protection six months later. The ongoing study with more than 44,000 participants across the Americas and Europe determined the vaccine was overall 91.1 percent effective, after 81 cases emerged among the vaccinated and 873 among those who received the placebo. The efficacy of the vaccine against severe disease including hospitalizations remained high, at 97 percent. Researchers will continue to observe participants of the study up to two years and combined with "real-world" data "will determine whether a booster is likely to be beneficial after a longer interval." If the efficacy continued to decrease at the current rate, it could fall below 50 percent within 18 months, suggesting that booster shots could be needed.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Qualcomm's bumper Q3 growth comes with supply constraints warning, but Intel may ride to the rescue

The Register - Thu, 29/07/2021 - 13:15
Company confirms it's investigating adding Chipzilla to multi-source vendor list, alongside TSMC and Samsung

Qualcomm's strong financials for the third quarter of 2021 come with a warning. Supply shortages aren't over yet – and the fabless chip maker may be turning to Intel to help meet demand.…

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Microsoft's new 'power app converging model' hits public preview with Custom Pages

The Register - Thu, 29/07/2021 - 12:28
Aims to heal perplexing split between Canvas and Model-driven apps

Microsoft's Custom Pages, an effort to converge its two different low-code Power App platforms, are now in public preview - though it is more hybrid than truly converged.…

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Equiniti wins Northern Ireland Finance Department contract to build land revenue system... 4 years after project proposed

The Register - Thu, 29/07/2021 - 11:43
Now that's agile

Northern Ireland's Department of Finance has awarded IT services firm Equiniti a contract worth up to £80m to build a land revenue and benefits system in a procurement four years in the making.…

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Hard drives at Autonomy offices were destroyed the same month CEO Lynch quit, extradition trial was told

The Register - Thu, 29/07/2021 - 11:01
Court finally hands down written ruling – and it's very bad news for UK exec

Analysis  Autonomy personnel were instructed to destroy hard drives at the company's offices nearly a year after the buyout of the software bz by HP, a court ruling in ex-CEO Mike Lynch's extradition battle has revealed.…

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Amazon's Older Kindles Will Start To Lose Their Internet Access In December

Slashdot - Thu, 29/07/2021 - 11:00
Amazon's Kindle e-readers with built-in 3G will begin to lose the ability to connect to the internet on their own in the US in December, according to an email sent to customers on Wednesday. The Verge reports: The change is due to mobile carriers transitioning from older 2G and 3G networking technology to newer 4G and 5G networks. For older Kindles without Wi-Fi, this change could mean not connecting to the internet at all. As Good e-Reader first noted in June, newer Kindle devices with 4G support should be fine, but for older devices that shipped with support for 3G and Wi-Fi like the Kindle Keyboard (3rd generation), Kindle Touch (4th generation), Kindle Paperwhite (4th, 5th, 6th, and 7th generation), Kindle Voyage (7th generation), and Kindle Oasis (8th generation), users will be stuck with Wi-Fi only. In its email announcement, Amazon stresses that you can still enjoy the content you already own and have downloaded on these devices, you just won't be able to download new books from the Kindle Store unless you're doing it over Wi-Fi. Things get more complicated for Amazon's older Kindles, like the Kindle (1st and 2nd generation), and the Kindle DX (2nd generation). Since those devices relied solely on 2G or 3G internet connectivity, once the networks are shut down, the only way to get new content onto your device will be through an old-fashioned micro-USB cable. For customers affected by the shutdown, Amazon is offering a modest promotional credit (NEWKINDLE50) through August 15th for $50 towards a new Kindle Paperwhite or Kindle Oasis, along with $15 in-store credit for ebooks. While arguably the company could do more to help affected customers (perhaps by replacing older devices entirely) this issue is largely out of Amazon's hands.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Beige pencil stockists on high alert as 'Colouring Book of Retro Computers' hits the crowdfunding circuit

The Register - Thu, 29/07/2021 - 10:15
YouTuber's project already well past its goal

Neil Thomas, host of the RMC vintage computing and gaming YouTube channel, is crowdfunding a colouring book of vintage computing hardware.…

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Ex-health secretary said 'vast majority' were 'onside' with GP data grab. Consumer champion Which? reckons 20 million don't even know what it is

The Register - Thu, 29/07/2021 - 09:30
Guess what? When people find out about the scheme, trust in the NHS falls

Around 20 million people in England are in the dark over plans to share their GP medical records with a NHS Digital database, according to a study by not-for-profit consumer watchdog Which?…

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Israeli authorities investigate NSO Group over Pegasus spyware abuse claims

The Register - Thu, 29/07/2021 - 08:00
Reason for probe unknown, but CEO claims it will vindicate company's claims

Israel's Ministry of Defense says the nation's government has visited spyware-for-governments developer NSO Group to investigate allegations its wares have been widely – and perhaps willingly – misused.…

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First Detection of Light From Behind a Black Hole

Slashdot - Thu, 29/07/2021 - 08:00
Stanford University astrophysicist Dan Wilkins has spotted the first detection of light from behind a black hole. Phys.Org reports: "Any light that goes into that black hole doesn't come out, so we shouldn't be able to see anything that's behind the black hole," said Wilkins, who is a research scientist at the Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology at Stanford and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. It is another strange characteristic of the black hole, however, that makes this observation possible. "The reason we can see that is because that black hole is warping space, bending light and twisting magnetic fields around itself," Wilkins explained. The strange discovery, detailed in a paper published July 28 in Nature, is the first direct observation of light from behind a black hole -- a scenario that was predicted by Einstein's theory of general relativity but never confirmed, until now. "Fifty years ago, when astrophysicists starting speculating about how the magnetic field might behave close to a black hole, they had no idea that one day we might have the techniques to observe this directly and see Einstein's general theory of relativity in action," said Roger Blandford, a co-author of the paper who is the Luke Blossom Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences and Stanford and SLAC professor of physics and particle physics. The original motivation behind this research was to learn more about a mysterious feature of certain black holes, called a corona. Material falling into a supermassive black hole powers the brightest continuous sources of light in the universe, and as it does so, forms a corona around the black hole. This light -- which is X-ray light -- can be analyzed to map and characterize a black hole. [...] As Wilkins took a closer look to investigate the origin of the flares, he saw a series of smaller flashes. These, the researchers determined, are the same X-ray flares but reflected from the back of the disk -- a first glimpse at the far side of a black hole. [...] The mission to characterize and understand coronas continues and will require more observation.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Here's a list of the flaws Russia, China, Iran and pals exploit most often, say Five Eyes infosec agencies

The Register - Thu, 29/07/2021 - 07:26
And you've patched them all, haven't you, diligent readers?

Western cybersecurity agencies have published a list of 30 of the most exploited vulnerabilities abused by hostile foreign states in 2020, urging infosec bods to ensure their networks and deployments are fully patched against them.…

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