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DRAM, it stacks up: SK hynix rolls out 819GB/s HBM3 tech

The Register - Wed, 20/10/2021 - 16:13
Kit using the chips to appear next year at the earliest

Korean DRAM fabber SK hynix has developed an HBM3 DRAM chip operating at 819GB/sec.…

Categories: Technology

Bitcoin Hits New All-Time High Above $65K

Slashdot - Wed, 20/10/2021 - 15:45
Bitcoin, the world's largest cryptocurrency by market capitalization, has hit a new all-time high above $65,000. From a report: The crypto broke above its previous high of $64,889 reached in April. Bitcoin is currently changing hands for around $65,607, up 4.2% over the past 24 hours. The latest rally pushed bitcoin's year-to-date terms to 122%, according to CoinDesk data. The largest cryptocurrency appears to have gotten a push on Tuesday from the launch of the ProShares Bitcoin Strategy ETF, the first exchange-traded fund approved by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission to invest in bitcoin futures. Indeed, the new fund, traded on the New York Stock Exchange under the ticker $BITO, garnered a first-day trading volume of more than $1 billion, ranking it among the most successful launches of all time.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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UK's ARIA innovation body 'hasn't even begun to happen' says former research lead

The Register - Wed, 20/10/2021 - 15:38
DARPA imitator not doing much after two years of Johnson government

Updated  The UK's efforts to copy US government and military innovation outfit DARPA are stalling, according to a leading figure in research and development.…

Categories: Technology

The Royal Mint To Extract Gold From Old Phones

Slashdot - Wed, 20/10/2021 - 15:10
Gold and precious metals are to be extracted from old phones and laptops by Britain's coin-maker. From a report: The Royal Mint plans to introduce a world-first technology to the UK to recycle gold from electronic waste. Fewer than one fifth of electronic waste ends up being recycled, estimates show. The mint's chief executive Anne Jessopp said the technology would help to "make a genuine impact on one of the world's greatest environmental challenges." The Royal Mint has signed an agreement with Canadian start-up Excir to recover 99% and more of gold from devices' circuit boards. It said the chemistry selectively targets and extracts precious metals from circuit boards in seconds.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Facebook fined £50m in UK for 'conscious' refusal to report info and 'deliberate failure to comply' during Giphy acquisition probe

The Register - Wed, 20/10/2021 - 14:49
That rebrand can't come soon enough

The UK's Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) has smacked Facebook with a £50m ($68.7m) fine for "deliberately" not giving it the full picture about its ongoing $400m acquisition of gif-slinger Giphy.…

Categories: Technology

Not just deprecated, but deleted: Google finally strips File Transfer Protocol code from Chrome browser

The Register - Wed, 20/10/2021 - 14:07
A death by a thousand cuts

The Chromium team has finally done it – File Transfer Protocol (FTP) support is not just deprecated, but stripped from the codebase in the latest stable build of the Chrome browser, version 95.…

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New FCC Rules Could Force Wireless Carriers To Block Spam Texts

Slashdot - Wed, 20/10/2021 - 14:00
An anonymous reader quotes a report from Engadget: Under Acting Chairwoman Jessica Rosenworcel, the Federal Communications Commission is seeking to create new rules targeting spam text messages. Like another recent proposed rulemaking from the agency, the policy would push wireless carriers and telephone companies to block the spam before it ever gets to your phone. "We've seen a rise in scammers trying to take advantage of our trust of text messages by sending bogus robotexts that try to trick consumers to share sensitive information or click on malicious links," Rosenworcel said. "It's time we take steps to confront this latest wave of fraud and identify how mobile carriers can block these automated messages before they have the opportunity to cause any harm."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Technology

New FCC Rules Could Force Wireless Carriers To Block Spam Texts

Slashdot - Wed, 20/10/2021 - 14:00
An anonymous reader quotes a report from Engadget: Under Acting Chairwoman Jessica Rosenworcel, the Federal Communications Commission is seeking to create new rules targeting spam text messages. Like another recent proposed rulemaking from the agency, the policy would push wireless carriers and telephone companies to block the spam before it ever gets to your phone. "We've seen a rise in scammers trying to take advantage of our trust of text messages by sending bogus robotexts that try to trick consumers to share sensitive information or click on malicious links," Rosenworcel said. "It's time we take steps to confront this latest wave of fraud and identify how mobile carriers can block these automated messages before they have the opportunity to cause any harm."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Brave's homegrown search claims to protect your privacy but there's a long way to go if it's to challenge the big G

The Register - Wed, 20/10/2021 - 13:14
Ad-free now but not forever

The Brave browser will now default to the company's own search engine, claimed to preserve privacy, while a new Web Discovery Project aims to collect search data again with privacy protection.…

Categories: Technology

NHS Digital exposes hundreds of email addresses after BCC blunder copies in entire invite list to 'Let's talk cyber' event

The Register - Wed, 20/10/2021 - 12:28
It's like rai-iiiiiin on your wedding day

NHS Digital has scored a classic Mail All own-goal by dispatching not one, not two, not three, but four emails concerning an infosec breakfast briefing, each time copying the entirety of the invite list in on the messages.…

Categories: Technology

Hitting underground pipes and cables costs the UK £2.4bn a year. We need a data platform for that, says government

The Register - Wed, 20/10/2021 - 11:45
Atkins wins £23m deal to build National Underground Asset Register

The UK government has awarded management consultancy Atkins a £23m contract to help it get to grips with accidental damage to underground pipes and cables, which is costing £2.4bn a year.…

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Recycled Lithium Batteries As Good As Newly Mined, Study Finds

Slashdot - Wed, 20/10/2021 - 11:00
A new study by Wang and a team including researchers from the US Advanced Battery Consortium (USABC), and battery company A123 Systems, [...] shows that batteries with recycled cathodes can be as good as, or even better than those using new state-of-the-art materials. The findings have been published in the journal Joule. IEEE Spectrum reports: The team tested batteries with recycled NMC111 cathodes, the most common flavor of cathode containing a third each of nickel, manganese, and cobalt. The cathodes were made using a patented recycling technique that Battery Resources, a startup Wang co-founded, is now commercializing. The recycled material showed a more porous microscopic structure that is better for lithium ions to slip in and out of. The result: batteries with an energy density similar to those made with commercial cathodes, but which also showed up to 53% longer cycle life. While the recycled batteries weren't tested in cars, tests were done at industrially relevant scales. The researchers made 11 Ampere-hour industry-standard pouch cells loaded with materials at the same density as EV batteries. Engineers at A123 Systems did most of the testing, Wang says, using a protocol devised by the USABC to meet commercial viability goals for plug-in hybrid electric vehicles. He says the results prove that recycled cathode materials are a viable alternative to pristine materials.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Lunar rocks brought to Earth by China's Chang'e 5 show Moon's volcanoes were recently* active

The Register - Wed, 20/10/2021 - 10:58
* Just a couple of billion years

The Moon remained volcanically active much later than previously thought, judging from fragments of rocks dating back two billion years that were collected by China's Chang’e 5 spacecraft.…

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Centre for Computing History apologises to customers for 'embarrassing' breach

The Register - Wed, 20/10/2021 - 10:15
Website patched following phishing scam, no financial data exposed

The Centre for Computing History (CCH) in Cambridge, England, has apologised for an "embarrassing" breach in its online customer datafile, though thankfully no payment card information was exposed.…

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Ancient with a dash of modern: We joined the Royal Navy to find there's little new in naval navigation

The Register - Wed, 20/10/2021 - 09:30
Following the Fleet Navigating Officers' course

Boatnotes II  The art of not driving your warship into the coast or the seabed is a curious blend of the ancient and the very modern, as The Reg discovered while observing the Royal Navy's Fleet Navigating Officers' (FNO) course.…

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Darmstadt, we have a problem – ESA reveals its INTEGRAL space telescope was three hours from likely death

The Register - Wed, 20/10/2021 - 09:17
Gamma ray-spotting 'scope was spinning uncontrollably and unable to make 'leccy until dramatic rescue

The European Space Agency (ESA) revealed on Monday that its 19-year-old International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) had a near-death experience last month when failure of a small yet significant part caused it to spin uncontrollably and prevented its solar panels from generating power.…

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Facebook may soon reveal new name – we're sure <i>Reg</i> readers will be more creative than Zuck's marketroids

The Register - Wed, 20/10/2021 - 08:01
We've kicked things off with the most splendidly evil fictional corporations, feel free to share your ideas

POLL  Consumer tech outlet The Verge today reports that Facebook may soon reveal a new name.…

Categories: Technology

Before the New Version, Let's Revisit 1984's Dune

Slashdot - Wed, 20/10/2021 - 08:00
Thelasko shares a report from Ars Technica, written by Peter Opaskar: Frank Herbert's 1965 sci-fi novel Dune gets a new film adaptation -- this one helmed by Denis Villeneuve (Arrival, Blade Runner 2049) -- later this month. But before Ars Technica reviews the movie, there's the matter of its predecessor: 1984's Dune, made by a then up-and-coming filmmaker named David Lynch. Detractors call Lynch's saga -- a tale of two noble space families 8,000 years in the future, fighting over the most valuable resource in the universe amidst sandworms the size of aircraft carriers -- incomprehensible, stilted, and ridiculous. It lost piles of money. Yet fans, especially in recent years, have reclaimed Lynch's film as a magnificent folly, a work of holy, glorious madness. So which group am I in? Both. Am I about to describe Dune as "so bad it's good"? No, that's a loser take for cowards. I once half-heard a radio interview with someone speculating that the then-current artistic moment was not "so bad it's good," and it wasn't "ironic" either -- it was actually "awesome." (I didn't catch who he was, so if any of this sounds familiar, hit me up in the comments.) Art can speak to you while at the same time being absurd. The relatable can sometimes be reached only by going through the ridiculous. The two can be inseparable, like the gravitational pull between a gas giant and its moon -- or Riggs and Murtaugh. The example the radio interviewee gave was of Evel Knievel, the '70s daredevil who wore a cape and jumped dirt bikes over rows of buses. Absurd? Heavens, yes. A feat of motorcycling and physicality? Absolutely. But beyond that, we can relate to Knievel's need to achieve transcendence at such a, shall we say, niche skill. We might also marvel at our own ability to be impressed by something that should be objectively useless but is instead actually awesome. A more contemporary example might be Tenet. It's a relentless international thriller about fate and climate change and the need for good people to hold evil at bay. But it's also a "dudes rock!" bromance between Two Cool Guys in Suits spouting sci-fi mumbo-jumbo. It can't be one without the other. "I have faith in Denis Villeneuve and his new version of Dune starring Timothee Chalamet," says Opaskar. "But it will probably be a normal movie for normal people, in which characters with recognizable emotions talk in a recognizable way and move through a plot we understand to achieve clearly defined goals. Which is all fine and good, but how likely is it to inspire sick beats for '90s kids doing ecstasy?"

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Technology

Sir Clive Sinclair inspired me and 'whole load of others' at Arm, says CEO Simon Segars

The Register - Wed, 20/10/2021 - 07:20
But of course chief exec's first computer was an Acorn

Like so many of us in tech, Arm CEO Simon Segars has his own computing origins story, which he shared during a speech on Tuesday at the Arm DevSummit developer conference.…

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Crims target telcos' Linux and Solaris boxes, which don't get enough infosec love

The Register - Wed, 20/10/2021 - 06:40
CrowdStrike says 'LightBasin' gang avoids Windows, and knows that telco networks run on badly-secured *nix

A mysterious criminal gang is targeting telcos' Linux and Solaris boxes, because it perceives they aren't being watched by infosec teams that have focussed their efforts on securing Windows.…

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